Writer Quotes

Permission to use quotations from this page is granted, subject to appropriate credit being given to the author and the full title of the book as the source. © Copyright 2016. Christopher Dines

“Scores of high-powered men and women are addicted to substances or destructive addictive patterns of behaviour. As a matter of fact, it is easier to hide one’s addiction while maintaining a high-powered position compared to the addicts and alcoholics we see sleeping on street corners.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“Love addicts often pick partners who are emotionally unavailable because deep down, they don’t feel worthy of having a healthy, loving relationship. A love addict craves and obsesses about becoming enmeshed or ‘one’ with another human being at all costs, even if it means putting themselves in potential danger.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“When we seek to escape from inner conflict and pain, we are running away from unresolved childhood trauma or original pain. Most people with serious addictive natures who are in the process of recovery have found that trauma played a huge role in escalating their addictions. It certainly did for me.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“It’s important to be aware that many families are dysfunctional, but we can change the patterns. Even if a child grew up in an aggressive or addictive household, they can heal and move past that with immense emotional resilience, wisdom and gratitude. This is what recovery can offer anyone who, like you, is open-minded, willing and ready to explore self-awareness and take action.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“When we practise self-compassion, we look after ourselves just as though we are nurturing a small child. In fact, a major part of grieving our original pain work (so that we can heal and be emotionally liberated) is to re-parent ourselves and reconnect with our inner child.

This is what the author, John Bradshaw, meant by ‘reclaiming our inner child’. In recovery, we can begin to nurture our inner child and connect deeply with our heart and spirit.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“Let’s remind ourselves that to be compassionate and forgiving doesn’t mean we are endorsing dysfunctional behaviour. On the contrary, it’s essential the harm that was inflicted upon us is properly validated and grieved. Forgiveness isn’t an intellectual concept or an airy-fairy idea. It’s a painstaking process. To be compassionate and to forgive mean we are gradually letting go of poisonous, toxic feelings that are trapped in our minds and bodies.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“In the addiction recovery community, we recognise that addicts can starve themselves of receiving social, sexual or emotional nourishment. Sex and love addicts starve themselves of a healthy, personal relationship and, consequently, deliberately avoid wholesome relationships with other human beings. We’re getting quite deep now, but there are many papers and books published on sexual and emotional anorexia. I have also suffered from emotional anorexia. It’s no myth!”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“The Karpman drama triangle is a classic model of codependent behaviour. First of all, a codependent will rescue someone. Then, when their ‘brave and charitable’ work hasn’t been acknowledged, they become very angry at the person they have attempted to rescue. And finally, they start to feel like a victim. They feel sorry for themselves and complain how the person they rescued never appreciated them. The important thing to learn here is that if a person wants to change, it’s because they have made a decision to do so.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“Think of an untreated sex addict who spends hours every night until the early hours watching pornography on the internet instead of spending that time with their wife or husband, and then becomes so tired due to the late nights that their professional life suffers. The sex addict’s behaviour will cause resentment, destroy trust and create economic insecurities in the family and home.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“To stay true to ourselves and remain kind to others is an art. It does require daily vigilance and, at the same time, it’s important to remember that art can often get messy.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“Healthy and non-shaming mirroring is an important part of the process. We can gain this from a highly emotionally intelligent and effective peer group that has our best interests at heart.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

“Isms’ are described as transference of addictive patterns of dysfunctional behaviour, passed down from generation to generation. For instance, if a mother was an alcoholic who never made it into recovery, her behaviour would leave a mark on her children, husband, etc. Unless her adult children join some sort of recovery programme and adopt the mindfulness practice, they will have very similar behaviour traits to their mother but minus the alcohol abuse. There is a strong possibility that they will become codependent and form relationships with other codependents or alcoholics.”
Christopher Dines, The Kindness Habit: Transforming our Relationship to Addictive Behaviours

 “When you can begin to see the similarities between you and your work colleagues in respect of ‘being human’ and the collective challenges we all face, it makes life much easier to deal with, especially when met with overbearing behaviour.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “Like gratitude, authentic appreciation in the workplace is a realisation that can be nurtured and accessed with daily mindful practice. By and large, people who are grateful, happy and enthusiastic are going to demonstrate better performance than those who are unhappy and unappreciative. There is increasing evidence that a grateful mindset amplifies happiness and mental and emotional wellbeing.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “First and foremost, if we maintain healthy emotional boundaries and direct love and kindness inwards, we are taking care of ourselves and secondly we are giving a subliminal message to others about how we wish to be treated. People tend to subconsciously treat us how we treat ourselves.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

25520425 Blog “To be self-compassionate is not to be self-indulgent or self-centred. A major component of self-compassion is to be kind to yourself. Treat yourself with love, care, dignity and make your wellbeing a priority. With self-compassion, we still hold ourselves accountable professionally and personally, but there are no toxic emotions inflicted upon and towards ourselves.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

25520425 Blog “Conscious breathing anchors us into the nowness of life and gives us a fresh outlook, no different from how a baby observes reality without mental commentary. The baby enjoys watching the world and human activity without any limiting mental concepts spoiling his or her perception. Naturally, we all have to evolve from the helpless state of babyhood, but to be able to tap into that wonderful ability and truly BE in the moment is immensely liberating.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals 

25520425 Blog “Through practising body scan awareness meditation, we can greatly reduce the detrimental effects of stress and make our working lives pleasant and enjoyable.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

25520425 Blog “We cannot control the mind by trying to force it to be peaceful or positive. Many have attempted this using a plethora of methods throughout the ages, but it simply does not work. Trying to fight the human mind is like walking into a lion’s den empty-handed and believing that you have a realistic chance of defending yourself.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “Mindfulness (present-moment awareness) is deliberately focusing our attention on our thoughts, emotions, feelings, sensations and mental activity without losing awareness of what is happening in the present moment. It is essentially being in a state of present-moment awareness and maintaining clarity without being swayed or distracted by mental commentary.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals 

25520425 Blog “The word ‘pranayama’, often referred to as alternate breathing, comes from the Sanskrit meaning ‘extension of life force’ or ‘extension of breath’. At times, we are going to have days where we are bombarded with one task after another. This simple yet effective meditation only takes a couple of minutes and its calming qualities can be felt almost immediately. It is one of the easiest meditation techniques to apply. This practice is well worth applying at least three or four times a day (somewhere private) to develop emotional balance and evenness of mind, especially in the working environment.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “The human brain is incredible in its capacity to heal and rewire itself. The human brain can be shaped and trained to be more resilient, calm, compassionate and alert—we can condition ourselves to be successful. Through mindfulness meditation, we can literally re-wire our brains through new experiences, which modify our neural network and our neural chemistry. Mindfulness also enhances gamma synchrony and improves the function of the human brain.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals 

“Many of us have been unconsciously programmed to treat walking as a means to an end, especially while in the workplace. Naturally, a lack of mindfulness while walking leaves one hostage to self-perpetuating stress and anxiety. We rush (often while shouting into a mobile phone), completely missing the enjoyment of walking. Walking and breathing, if practised harmoniously, can be peaceful and thoroughly enjoyable. Even walking down a corridor or into an office or wherever we are working or being of service can be a harmonious action.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “The process of applying Mindfulness Burnout Prevention (MBP) in the workplace or any environment has a much more far-reaching effect than simply accessing equanimity throughout the vicissitudes of life. Continuous learning helps us to stay youthful, sharpen our mental faculties and wire new neural connections in our brain (making us better equipped to accomplish); it is also a sign of humility.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

 “Learning to practise mindfulness greatly enhances our ability to manifest emotional intelligence and equanimity under pressure and to display calmness, empathy and adaptability when communicating with others, whether it be with co-workers, clients or the board of directors. Learning to apply mindfulness on a daily basis will significantly encourage a positive, creative and enthusiastic attitude at all levels in companies large and small.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Burnout Prevention: An 8-Week Course for Professionals

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “One of the greatest challenges facing humanity is that of being able to live with one another in a peaceful and civilized way. We all have our individual uniqueness and perceptions of how we believe the world ought to function. This creates conflict unless there is a deeper realization in the collective consciousness and an understanding that most human desires desecrate the beauty of the nowness of life.” ― Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “Anxiety and stress-related mental dysfunction is the plague of modern-day society. Millions of people are tormented by anxious thinking and the consequent distress this brings, irrespective of whether they live in a mansion or a bed-sit or whether they earn millions or are living on the breadline. This would indicate that external circumstances cannot prevent or cause pathological anxiety or free people from negative emotions.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “The most efficient way to transcend unsettling thoughts is through the life breath. When we bring our full attention to the life breath, it becomes a gateway to access a deeper and higher level of awareness.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “The key to accessing love, joy, peace and compassion is to be free from the dominant state of compulsive thinking. Once we are able to flow into mindfulness and still our thoughts, happiness manifests.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life“Through mindfully practising love and compassion we are able to heal our hearts and minds from our hurt and suffering, thus bringing harmony into this world. The more we are open to love, the easier it is to share kindness with all living creatures.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “Remember that if you do not put your own well-being first you cannot love yourself and thus, you cannot truly love and be compassionate towards others.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “When we truly forgive in our hearts, not only do we purify ourselves from the heavy burdens of negative karma but we begin to create a new space for positive energy to enter this world. When we forgive, we are no longer chained to the negative actions we have created in the past.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “It will be increasingly difficult to be of maximum service to the world if we cannot or will not be open-minded and understanding towards people who might “appear” to be different from ourselves. When we can love someone who is not like us, we are living mindfully.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “The most efficient way to transcend unsettling thoughts is through the life breath. When we bring our full attention to the life breath, it becomes a gateway to access a deeper and higher level of awareness. We can see our aggressive and disturbing thoughts for what they really are: shallow, short-lived, frequently wrong and at times, comical. Therefore, pay attention to your breathing as often as possible. This is the bedrock to inner peace and tranquility.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

Mindfulness Meditation Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life “The evidence of grave emotional and mental suffering is clear to see in the growing number of mental health units, “rehabs” and overflowing psychiatric wards as people try to find relief in compulsive drinking, drug abuse, gambling, over-eating, under-eating, chasing prestige, hoarding money, “retail therapy” and over-indulging in pornography and sex.”
Christopher Dines, Mindfulness Meditation: Bringing Mindfulness into Everyday Life

 “Your state of consciousness, right now, will determine what you manifest in the future.”
Christopher Dines, Manifest Your Bliss: A Spiritual Guide to Inner Peace

 “Enlightened people and serene landscapes can help to elevate our inner bliss but the awareness must first be realized from within.”
Christopher Dines, Manifest Your Bliss: A Spiritual Guide to Inner Peace

 “Nothing and no-one can raise our consciousness to a field of pure bliss unless we are open to the timeless dimension operating within us. We can only do this by being present and releasing all negative energy.”
Christopher Dines, Manifest Your Bliss: A Spiritual Guide to Inner Peace

 “Once we stop “searching” for joyful feelings in people and things, no matter what polarity the external world brings us (positive or negative), we can still be aware of the inner peace that resides in our consciousness.”
Christopher Dines, Manifest Your Bliss: A Spiritual Guide to Inner Peace

 “Needing nothing gives you everything.”
Christopher Dines, Manifest Your Bliss: A Spiritual Guide to Inner Peace